National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
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Congressional Justification FY 2016

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

On this page:

Office of the Director

Josephine P. Briggs, M.D.
 Director

David Shurtleff, Ph.D.
Deputy Director

National Advisory Council for Complementary and Integrative Health

  • Office of Clinical and
    Regulatory Affairs

    Catherine Meyers, M.D.
     Director

  • Office of Administrative
    Operations

    Wendy Liffers, J.D., M.A.
    Executive Officer

  • Office of Communications
    and Public Liaison

    Alyssa Cotler, M.P.H.
     Director

  • Office of Policy,
    Planning, and Evaluation

    Karin Lohman, Ph.D.
     Director

  • Division of
    Extramural Research

    Emmeline Edwards, Ph.D.
     Director

    Partap Khalasa, D.C., Ph.D.
    Deputy Director

    • Basic and Mechanistic Research in Complementary and Integrative Health Branch

      John Willamson, Ph.D.
       Chief

    • Clinical Research in Complementary and Integrative Health Branch

      Wendy Weber, N.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.
       Chief

  • Division of
    Intramural Research

    M. Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D.
    Scientific Director

    • Clinical Investigations
      Branch

      M. Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D.
      Acting Chief

    • Pain and Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory

      M. Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D.
       Chief

  • Division of
    Extramural Activities

    Martin Goldrosen, Ph.D.
     Director

    • Office of
      Scientific Review

      Dale Birkle Dreer, Ph.D.
       Chief

    • Office of Grants Management

      George Tucker, M.B.A.
       Director


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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the PHS Act with respect to complementary and integrative health, [$124,681,000]$127,521,000[: Provided, That these funds may be used to support the transition enacted in section 224 of this Act].

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Amounts Available for Obligation 1
(Dollars in Thousands)
Source of Funding FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget
1 Excludes the following amounts for reimbursable activities carried out by this account:
FY 2014—$460         FY 2015—$410         FY 2016—$410
Appropriation $124,296 $124,681 $127,521
Type 1 Diabetes 0 0 0
Rescission 0 0 0
Sequestration 0 0 0
FY 2014 First Secretary's Transfer -312 0 0
FY 2014 Second Secretary's Transfer -24 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted appropriation $123,960 $124,681 $127,521
OAR HIV/AIDS Transfers 0 -619 0
National Children's Study Transfers 409 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority $124,369 $124,062 $127,521
Unobligated balance, start of year 0 0 0
Unobligated balance, end of year 0 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority $124,369 $124,062 $127,521
Unobligated balance lapsing -1 0 0
Total obligations $124,368 $124,062 $127,521

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Budget Mechanism—Total1
(Dollars in Thousands)
MECHANISM FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget FY 2016 +/- FY 2015
No. Amount No. Amount No. Amount No. Amount

1 All items in italics and brackets are non-add entries.

Research Projects:                
Noncompeting 122 $54,723 123 $56,80 120 $57,310 -3 $510
Administrative Supplements (6) 303 (5) 500 (5) 500 (0) 0
Competing:                
Renewal 4 3,969 4 1,537 4 1,652 0 115
New 39 15,783 32 14,846 35 15,952 3 1,106
Supplements 2 914 4 631 4 678 0 47
Subtotal, Competing 45 $20,666 40 $17,014 43 $18,282 3 $1,268
Subtotal, RPGs 167 $75,692 163 $74,314 163 $76,092 0 $1,778
SBIR/STTR 11 3,195 10 3,306 11 3,568 1 262
Research Project Grants 178 $78,887 173 $77,620 174 $79,660 1 $2,040
Research Centers:                
Specialized/Comprehensive 5 $3,095 6 $3,572 7 $5,308 1 $1,776
Clinical Research 0 449 0 750 0 0 0 -750
Biotechnology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Comparative Medicine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Minority Institutions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers 5 $3,545 6 $4,292 7 $5,318 1 $1,026
Other Research:                
Research Careers 33 $4,345 30 $4,039 29 $4,039 -1 $0
Cancer Education 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cooperative Clinical Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Research Support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Minority Biomedical Research Support 0 183 0 0 0 0 0
Other 6 1,533 5 1,679 3 1,406 -2 -273
Other Research 39 $6,061 35 $5,718 32 $5,445 -3 -$273
Total Research Grants 222 $88,492 214 $87,630 213 $90,423 -1 $2,793
Ruth L Kirchstein Training Awards: FTTPs   FTTPs   FTTPs   FTTPs  
Individual Awards 10 $604 8 $471 8 $471 0 $0
Institutional Awards 39 2,130 35 2,263 35 2,263 0 0
Total Research Training 49 $2,735 43 $2,734 43 $2,734 0 $0
Research & Develop. Contracts 9 $9,511 11 $9,594 11 $10,094 0 $500
(SBIR/STTR) (non-add) (0) (9) (0) (7) (0) (7) (0) (-0)
Intramural Research 9 8,131 9 8,294 9 8,460 0 166
Res. Management & Support 66 15,500 67 15,810 67 15,810 0 0
Res. Management & Support (SBIR Admin) (non-add) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0)
Construction   0   0   0   0
Buildings and Facilities   0   0   0   0
Total, NCCIH 75 $124,369 76 $124,062 76 $127,521 0 $3,459

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Major Changes in the Fiscal Year 2016 President's Budget Request

Major changes by budget mechanism and/or budget activity detail are briefly described below. The FY 2016 President’s Budget request for the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health is $127.5 million, an increase of $3.5 million over the FY 2015 level.

Research Project Grants (+$2.04 million; total $79.66 million): NCCIH will support a total of 174 Research Project Grant (RPG) awards in FY 2016. Noncompeting RPGs will increase by $0.51 million. Competing RPG awards will increase by 3 and $1.27 million.

In FY 2014, NIH launched the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative as a large-scale effort to equip researchers with fundamental insights necessary for treating a wide variety of devastating brain disorders like Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. NIH is requesting a total of $70 million in new funding for this Presidential initiative. NCCIH is requesting $1 million in its FY 2016 budget to support this priority.

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Summary of Changes1
(Dollars in Thousands)
FY 2015 Enacted $124,062
FY 2016 President’s Budget $127,521
Net change $3,459
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Summary of Changes1 (continued)
CHANGES FY 2016 President's Budget Change from FY 2015
FTEs Budget Authority FTEs Budget Authority

1 The amounts in the Change from FY 2014 column take into account funding reallocations, and therefore may not add to the net change reflected herein.

A. Built-in:        
1. Intramural Research:        
a. Annualization of January 2015 pay increase & benefits   $2,289   $2
b. January FY 2015 pay increase & benefits   2,289   17
c. One more day of pay (n/a for 2015)   2,289   0
d. Differences attributable to change in FTE   2,289   0
e. Payment for centrally furnished services   1,278   8
f. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, other expenses, and non-recurring costs   4,892   0
Subtotal       $19
2. Research Management and Support:        
a. Annualization of January 2014 pay increase & benefits   $9,861   $26
b. January FY 2016 pay increase & benefits   9,861   74
c. One more day of pay (n/a for 2015))   9,861   0
d. Differences attributable to change in FTE   9,861   0
e. Payment for centrally furnished services   354   0
f. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, other expenses, and non-recurring costs   5,594   0
Subtotal       $100
Subtotal, Built-in       $119
  No. Amount No. Amount
B. Program:        
1. Research Project Grants:        
a. Noncompeting 120 $57,810 -3 $510
b. Competing 43 18,282 3 1,268
c. SBIR/STTR 11 3,568 1 262
Subtotal, RPGs 174 $79,660 1 $2,040
2. Research Centers 7 $5,318 1 $1,026
3. Other Research 32 5,445 -3 -273
4. Research Training 43 2,734 0 0
5. Research and development contracts 11 10,094 0 500
Subtotal, Extramural   $103,251   $3,292
  FTEs   FTEs  
6. Intramural Research 9 $8,460 0 $166
7. Research Management and Support 67 15,810 0 0
8. Construction   0   0
9. Buildings and Facilities   0   0
Subtotal, program 76 $127,521 0 $3,459
Total changes       $3,459

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Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Graphs

 

History of Budget Authority and FTEs:

Bar chart of Funding Levels by Fiscal Year. See table immediately below for data.
Funding Levels by Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Dollars in Millions
2012 $127.8
2013 $120.6
2014 $124.4
2015 $124.1
2016 $127.5
Bar chart of Full-Time Employees by fiscal year. See table immediately below for data.
Full-Time Employees by Fiscal Year1
FY FTEs
2012 69
2013 74
2014 75
2015 76
2016 76

1 FY 2012 is non-comparable for DEAS transfer.


 

Distribution by Mechanism

A pie chart of distribution of funds by mechanism for fiscal year 2016. See table immediately below for data.
FY 2015 Budget Mechanism
Mechanism Dollars in Thousands Percent
of
Budget
Research Project Grants $79,660 62%
Research Centers $5,318 4%
Other Research $5,445 4%
Research Training $2,734 2%
R&D Contracts $10,094 9%
Intramural Research $8,460 7%
RMS $15,810 12%

 

Change by Selected Mechanism

A bar graph reflecting the change in mechanism as a percent between fiscal years 2015 and 2016.
FY 2016 Estimated Percent Change from FY 2015 Mechanism
Mechanism Percent
Change
Research Project Grants 2.63%
Research Centers 23.91%
Other Research -4.78%
Research Training -0.02%
R&D Contracts 5.21%
Intramural Research 2.01%
Res. Mgmt. & Support 0.00%

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Budget Authority by Activity1
(Dollars in Thousands)
  FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget FY 2016 +/- FY 2015

1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.

Extramural Research FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount
Detail                
Clinical Research   $53,718   $53,031   $54,669   $1,639
Basic Research   37,817   37,334   38,488   1,154
R&D Training   9,203   9,594   10,094   500
Subtotal, Extramural   $100,738   $99,959   $100,642   $3,292
Intramural Research 9 $8,131 9 $8,294 9 $8,460 0 $166
Research Management & Support 66 $15,500 67 $15,810 67 $15,810 0 $0
TOTAL 75 $124,369 76 $124,062 76 $127,521 0 $3,459

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Authorizing Legislation
  PHS Act/Other Citation U.S. Code Citation 2015 Amount Authorized FY 2015 Enacted 2016 Amount Authorized FY 2016 President’s Budget
Research and Investigation Section 301 42§241 Indefinite Combined   Indefinite Combined  
        $124,062,000   $127,521,000
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health Section 401(a) 42§281 Indefinite   Indefinite  
Total, Budget Authority         $124,062,000     $127,521,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Appropriations History
Fiscal Year Budget Estimate
to Congress
House Allowance Senate Allowance Appropriation
2006 $122,692,000 $122,692,000 $126,978,000 $122,692,000
Rescission       ($1,227,000)
2007 $120,554,000 $120,554,000 $121,982,000 $121,576,000
Rescission       $0
2008 $121,699,000 $123,380,000 $124,213,000 $121,577,000
Rescission       ($2,162,000)
Supplemental       $647,000
2009 $121,695,000 $125,878,000 $125,082,000 $125,471,000
Rescission       $0
2010 $127,241,000 $129,953,000 $127,591,000 $128,844,000
Rescission       $0
2011 $132,004,000   $131,796,000 $128,844,000
Rescission       ($1,131,327)
2012 $131,002,000 $131,002,000 $126,275,000 $128,299,000
Rescission       ($242,485)
2013 $127,930,000 $128,318,000 $128,056,515
Rescission       ($256,113)
Sequestration       ($6,427,556)
2014 $129,041,000   $128,183,000 $124,296,000
Rescission       $0
2015 $124,509,000     $124,681,000
Rescission       $0
2016       $127,521,000

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Justification of Budget Request

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Authorizing Legislation: Section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Service Act, as amended.

Budget Authority (BA):

  FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget FY 2016 +/- FY 2015
BA $124,368,507 $124,062,000 $127,521,000 + $3,459,000
FTE 75 76 76 0

Program funds are allocated as follows: Competitive Grants/Cooperative Agreements; Contracts; Direct Federal/Intramural and Other.

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Director's Overview

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) is the lead Federal agency for scientific research on the usefulness and safety of complementary and integrative health practices. Complementary and integrative health approaches include modalities and products with a history of use or origins outside of conventional medicine. Examples include: mind-body interventions, such as massage, acupuncture, yoga, and meditation; and natural products, such as, dietary supplements, and probiotics. To address the need for objective evidence as to the safety and efficacy of many of these approaches, NCCIH supports rigorous scientific investigation to better understand how these interventions work, for whom, and the optimal method of practice and delivery.

Many individuals seek complementary and integrative health approaches to improve their health and well-being or to manage symptoms associated with chronic diseases or conditions. Results from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with support from NCCIH, indicates that over one-third of the U.S. population uses complementary and integrative health approaches.1 Natural products such as nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements are the most commonly used complementary health approach, followed by deep breathing exercises, and yoga (see Program Portrait – Use of Complementary and Integrative Health in the United States for details).

Reducing Pain and Improving Symptom Management

Pain is the most common reason Americans turn to complementary and integrative health practices. Each year, approximately 100 million Americans experience chronic pain. Both the expenses of treatment and lost productivity cost the nation approximately $600 billion annually.2 For people living with pain, many conventional treatment options provide inadequate relief. To address this urgent public health need, NCCIH invests in research on pain and the non-pharmacological management of pain. NCCIH’s Intramural Research Program is devoted to studying the role of the brain in perceiving, modifying, and managing pain. Intramural scientists are investigating the role of the brain in pain processing and control, and how factors such as emotion, attention, environment, and genetics affect pain perception. Through its extramural research program, NCCIH supports investigators examining the safety and efficacy of a wide range of complementary health approaches for pain management, such as mindfulness meditation, spinal manipulation, massage, tai chi, yoga, and acupuncture. Furthermore, NCCIH participates in the NIH BRAIN Initiative (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies), which aims to revolutionize our understanding of the human brain by accelerating the development and application of innovative technologies. These research efforts may yield insights into the role of brain mechanisms in chronic pain.

To address the critical need for non-drug options to treat and manage chronic pain, NCCIH is collaborating with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) on a clinical research program in military and veteran populations. These populations are disproportionately affected by pain and prescription drug abuse.3 Through this collaboration, 13 research projects are being funded that explore non-drug approaches to manage pain and related health conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, drug abuse and sleep disorders. In addition, a working group of NCCIH’s Advisory Council, along with VA and Department of Defense (DOD) stakeholders, developed recommendations for future collaborations among NCCIH, VA, and DOD.

Advancing Research on Natural Products

A major health concern for the American public is the safety and efficacy of natural products, whether consumed as dietary supplements, herbs, botanicals, or probiotics. Accordingly, NCCIH supports research on the biological mechanisms of both beneficial and harmful effects of natural products, including their interaction with medications. In FY 2016, NCCIH expects to award and establish a Center of Excellence for Natural Product Drug Interaction Research to systematically examine natural product drug interaction and disseminate the findings broadly. To propel needed innovations in technology and methodology in the field of natural products research, NCCIH, in partnership with the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, plans to support a Center for Advancing Natural Products Technology and Innovation in FY 2015.

The 2012 NHIS found that Americans’ consumption of probiotics has increased four-fold since 2007.4 This finding underscores the need for better information on the safety and efficacy of probiotics. Probiotics are live microorganisms (in most cases, bacteria) available as dietary supplements and in some dairy food, such as yogurt, that may be helpful for diarrhea and possibly other health-related conditions. Evidence is emerging about the importance of bacteria in the intestinal tract (gut microbiota) in weight management, inflammation, and other conditions, though the role that probiotics play in maintaining or restoring gut microbiota requires further investigation. NCCIH aligns its probiotics research program with the trans-NIH Human Microbiome Project and works closely with other NIH ICs, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Department of Agriculture.

Strengthening the Workforce in Complementary and Integrative Health Research

NCCIH supports a variety of training and career development programs to increase the number, quality, and diversity of skilled researchers who can advance the field of complementary and integrative health research. The new Interdisciplinary Complementary and Integrative Health Clinical Training Award funds partnerships between research intensive institutions and those focused on clinical training in complementary approaches.

Disseminating Knowledge

NCCIH makes research findings available to the public by leveraging emerging technologies and platforms, including video, social media, and mobile applications. NCCIH’s website provides information for consumers and healthcare providers. In addition, NCCIH engages the public directly through Twitter chats that cover a variety of health topics with leading experts. Through these approaches, science-based information on the safety and efficacy of complementary and integrative health practices is made available to a broad audience.

Overall IC Budget Policy:
Guided by its strategic plan, the advice of the National Advisory Council for Complementary and Integrative Health, and input from a diverse community of stakeholders, NCCIH builds the scientific evidence base for complementary and integrative medicine by stimulating research and increasing research capacity. In FY 2016, NCCIH will continue to fund multidisciplinary investigator-initiated research and encourage interdisciplinary research capacity building across the field of complementary and integrative health research. Areas of special emphasis include studies examining the effectiveness of complementary and integrative health approaches to alleviate chronic pain, and translational research to improve the quality, reproducibility, and comparability of clinical complementary and integrative health research.

1 Clarke T, Jones L, Stussman B, Barnes P, Nahin R. Trends in the Use of Complementary Health Approaches Among Adults: United States, 2002–2012.  In press.

2IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2011. “Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research. Washington DC: The National Academies Press.

3 Jonas W, Schoomaker E, Pain and Opioids in the Military: We Must Do Better. JAMA Internal Medicine. 2014;174(8);1402–03.

4 Clarke, in press.

Program Portrait: Use of Complementary and Integrative Health Practices in the United States

FY 2015 Level: $1.1 million

FY 2016 Level: $1.1 million

Change: $0.0 million

To better understand the patterns of use of complementary and integrative health practices in the United States, NCCIH collaborates with the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the development of a component of the annual National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) in which tens of thousands of Americans are interviewed about their health- and illness-related experiences. The complementary health supplement is administered every five years. NCCIH began this effort in 2002, and there have been subsequent surveys in 2007 and 2012.

The NHIS complementary health supplements are designed to help guide the NIH research agenda. These surveys provide the most comprehensive source of a wide range of information on complementary health approaches used by U.S. adults and children. Analysis of the 2012 NHIS data shows consumer patterns of use, including geographic variations:

  • 1 in 3 adults use complementary health approaches - the most common are natural products, deep breathing, and yoga.1
  • 1 in 5 adults use natural products (such as nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements, herbs, and probiotics).
  • From 2007 to 2012, Americans’ use of certain natural products correlated with results from other NCCIH-supported studies, which suggests that NCCIH’s research may impact consumer decision making.
    • Increases were seen in the use of fish oil, probiotics or prebiotics, and melatonin.
    • Decreases were seen in the use of glucosamine and/or chondroitin, Echinacea, garlic, ginseng, ginkgo biloba, MSM (methylsulfonylmethane), and saw palmetto.2
  • 9 percent of adults use chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation. Data from the 2012 survey showed that patterns of use vary by geographic region, with use in the West North Central region significantly higher at 16 percent and lower in the South and Southeast at 6 percent.2
  • Over a 10 year period, the number of Americans practicing yoga, tai chi, or qi gong for health benefits doubled from 5 percent in 2002, to10 percent in 2012. Use of yoga with deep breathing or meditation was approximately 40 percent higher in the Pacific and Mountain regions than in the United States overall.2
  • The percentage of adults using massage therapy was higher in the Pacific (9.4 percent), Mountain (9.4 percent), and West North Central (8.4 percent) regions than in the nation as a whole (6.8 percent).2

NCCIH continues to analyze the 2012 data, and expects to publish additional reports in FY 2015. NCCIH is also preparing for the next survey in 2017, by assessing and improving survey methods and questions.

____________

1 Clarke T, Jones L, Stussman B, Barnes P, Nahin R. Trends in the Use of Complementary Health Approaches Among Adults: United States, 2002-2012. In press.

2 Peregoy J, Clarke T, Jones L, et al. Regional Variation in Use of Complementary Health Approaches by U.S. Adults. NCHS Data Brief #146. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2014.


Program Portrait: New Standards to Advance NCCIH’s Research on Chronic Low Back Pain

FY 2015 Level: $6.0 million

FY 2016 Level: $6.0 million

Change: $0.0 million

Chronic low back pain (cLBP) is a common condition with few effective treatments. To better understand the causes of cLBP and develop improved treatment protocols and prevention strategies, NCCIH supports basic, translational, and clinical research. While there has been an abundance of research on cLBP, it is often a challenge to compare the results of cLBP studies as researchers may use inconsistent terminology, case definitions, baseline assessments, and outcome measures.

To develop measurement standards that will improve the consistency of cLBP classification, data collection, and other research methods across clinical studies on cLBP, the NIH Pain Consortium established a Task Force on Research Standards for Chronic Low Back Pain. Led by NCCIH staff, the Task Force engaged and worked with expert back pain investigators and issued a report that was published in four leading scientific journals. The Task Force report contains six recommendations:1

  1. Common definition of cLBP, based on two questions: a) How long has back pain been a problem? b) What fraction of days in the past 6 months involved back pain?
  2. Classification of cLBP by impact – consisting of the intensity of pain, its interference with normal activities, and the patient’s functional status.
  3. Minimal and uniform set of data to be reported in all studies – on medical history, physical examination, diagnostic tests, and self-report measures (in addition to pain intensity and pain interference).
  4. Outcome measures (including information about patients who respond to the intervention).
  5. New research to refine and improve these standards.
  6. Dissemination of the recommended standards to the broader research community.

The Task Force’s recommendations, considered to be a dynamic resource, are intended to help advance the field, resolve controversies, and increase reproducibility in future cLBP research. NCCIH’s portfolio of low back pain research will benefit from these efforts.

_______

1painconsortium.nih.gov/NIH_Pain_Programs/Task_Force/cLBP_RTF_FullReport.pdf (1.5MB PDF)


Program Descriptions and Accomplishments

Extramural Basic Research: Basic research on fundamental biological effects and active components of interventions is central to the development of the evidence base on complementary and integrative health approaches, and underpins the design of clinical research. NCCIH supports investigator-initiated basic research and will continue, through targeted initiatives, its support for basic and translational research on promising complementary interventions. For example, NCCIH funds five Centers of Excellence for Research on Complementary and Integrative Health which focus on basic, mechanistic, and translational research of a variety of complementary interventions. In addition, applications are under review for the Botanical Dietary Supplement Research Centers Request for Applications (RFA) and a new initiative to establish a Center for Advancing Natural Products Technology and Innovation.

Budget Policy:

The FY 2016 President’s Budget estimate for extramural basic research is $38.488 million or 3 percent above the FY 2015 level.

Extramural Clinical Research: The NCCIH extramural research program funds clinical investigations on complementary and integrative health practices and interventions. Projects range from small pilot studies to large-scale clinical trials and epidemiological studies, including several collaborations between NIH ICs and other Government agencies. For instance, NCCIH, in conjunction with NIDA and VA, is funding 13 studies on the non-pharmacological management of pain and other symptoms experienced by military personnel and veterans. In addition, several NCCIH-studies have yielded interesting results. For example, findings from the largest and most rigorous, randomized dose-response study of spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low-back pain suggest that 12 sessions may be the best “dose” for people with chronic low-back pain. Also, results of another study suggest that middle school-aged students who meditated during a six-week, classroom-based mindfulness meditation program were significantly less likely than non-meditators to develop suicidal or self-harming thoughts or behaviors.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2016 President’s Budget estimate for extramural clinical research is $54.669 million or 3 percent above the FY 2015 level.

Extramural Research Training and Capacity Building: Improving the capacity of the field to carry out rigorous research of complementary health interventions is a high priority for NCCIH. To increase the number, quality, and diversity of investigators who conduct research on complementary approaches, NCCIH supports a variety of training and career development activities for pre- and post-doctoral students, researchers, and clinicians. For example, NCCIH recently funded an award as part of a new training program, Interdisciplinary Complementary and Integrative Health Clinical Research Training Award, that funds partnerships between research intensive institutions and institutions focused on rigorous clinical research and training of practitioners in complementary modalities.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2016 President’s Budget estimate for extramural research training and capacity building is $10.094 million or 5 percent above the FY 2015 level.

Intramural Research: NCCIH’s intramural research program is focused on understanding the central mechanisms of pain and its modulation, with the long term goal of improving clinical management of chronic pain through the integration of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. Among topics of particular interest are the pathways and mechanisms by which emotion, attention, placebo effects, and other such processes modulate pain or pain processing. The program both engages and leverages the exceptional basic and clinical research talent and resources of other neuroscience and neuroimaging efforts within the NIH intramural community. NCCIH has recently hired several world renowned neuroscientists to work as tenure track investigators.

Budget Policy:

The FY 2016 President’s Budget estimate for intramural research is $8.460 million or 2 percent above the FY 2015 level.

Research Management and Support (RMS): Through its RMS activities, NCCIH provides administrative, budgetary, logistical, and scientific support in the review, award, monitoring, and management of research grants, training awards, and contracts. In addition, the Center provides reliable, objective, and science- and evidence-based information to the public, scientists, and healthcare providers so that they may make informed decisions about the use of complementary and integrative health therapies.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2016 President’s Budget estimate for research management and support is $15.810 million, which is at the same level as FY 2015.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Budget Authority by Object Class1
(Dollars in Thousands)
  FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget FY 2016 +/- FY 2015
1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
Total compensable workyears:
  Full-time employment 76 76 0
  Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours 0 0 0
  Average ES salary $0 $0 $0
  Average GM/GS grade 12.6 12.6 0.0
  Average GM/GS salary $0 $0 $0
  Average salary, grade established by act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) $93 $93 $0
  Average salary of ungraded positions $166 $166 $0
OBJECT CLASSES FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget FY 2016 +/- FY 2015
  Personnel Compensation:      
11.1 Full-Time Permanent $6,287 $6,374 $87
11.3 Other Than Full-Time Permanent 1,732 2,027 28
11.5 Other Personnel Compensation 135 137 2
11.7 Military Personnel 271 275 4
11.8 Special Personnel Services Payments 648 657 9
11.9 Subtotal Personnel Compensation $9,368 $9,498 $130
12.1 Civilian Personnel Benefits $2,479 $2,504 $25
12.2 Military Personnel Benefits 146 148 2
13.0 Benefits to Former Personnel 0 0 0
  Subtotal Pay Costs $11,994 $12,150 $156
21.0 Travel & Transportation of Persons $196 $200 $3
22.0 Transportation of Things 50 51 1
23.1 Rental Payments to GSA 0 0 0
23.2 Rental Payments to Others 0 0 0
23.3 Communications, Utilities & Misc. Charges 129 131 2
24.0 Printing & Reproduction 0 0 0
25.1 Consulting Services $536 $545 $9
25.2 Other Services 5,776 5,645 -131
25.3 Purchase of goods and services from government accounts 11,771 12,741 970
25.5 R&D Contracts 1,733 1,359 -374
25.6 Medical Care 10 11 0
25.7 Operation & Maintenance of Equipment 162 164 3
25.8 Subsistence & Support of Persons 0 0 0
25.0 Subtotal Other Contractual Services $20,057 $20,532 $476
26.0 Supplies & Materials $646 $656 $10
31.0 Equipment 632 643 10
32.0 Land and Structures 0 0 0
33.0 Investments & Loans 0 0 0
41.0 Grants, Subsidies & Contributions 90,357 93,158 2,801
42.0 Insurance Claims & Indemnities 0 0 0
43.0 Interest &aamp; Dividends 0 0 0
44.0 Refunds 0 0 0
  Subtotal Non-Pay Costs $112,068 $115,371 $3,303
  Total Budget Authority by Object Class $124,062 $127,521 $3,459

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Salaries and Expenses
(Dollars in Thousands)
OBJECT CLASSES FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President's Budget FY 2016 +/- FY 2015
Personnel Compensation:      
Full-Time Permanent (11.1) $6,287 $6,374 $87
Other Than Full-Time Permanent (11.3) 2,027 2,055 28
Other Personnel Compensation (11.5) 135 137 2
Military Personnel (11.7) 271 275 4
Special Personnel Services Payments (11.8) 648 657 9
Subtotal Personnel Compensation (11.9) $9,368 $9,498 $130
Civilian Personnel Benefits (12.1) $2,479 $2,504 $25
Military Personnel Benefits (12.2) 146 148 2
Benefits to Former Personnel (13.0) 0 0 0
Subtotal Pay Costs $11,994 $12,150 $156
Travel & Transportation of Persons (21.0) $196 $200 $3
Transportation of Things (22.0) 50 51 1
Rental Payments to Others (23.2) 0 0 0
Communications, Utilities & Misc. Charges (23.3) 129 131 2
Printing & Reproduction (24.0) 0 0 0
Other Contractual Services:      
Consultant Services (25.1) 511 519 8
Other Services (25.2) 5,776 5,645 -131
Purchases from government accounts (25.3) 8,672 8,867 195
Operation & Maintenance of Facilities (25.4) 68 68 0
Operation & Maintenance of Equipment (25.7) 162 164 3
Subsistence & Support of Persons (25.8) 0 0 0
Subtotal Other Contractual Services $15,189 $15,263 $74
Supplies & Materials (26.0) $646 $656 $10
Subtotal Non-Pay Costs $16,210 $16,301 $91
Total, Administrative Costs $28,204 $28,451 $247

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“NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health Detail of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTE) ” OFFICE/DIVISION FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Est. FY 2016 Est. Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Detail of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTE)
OFFICE/DIVISION FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Est. FY 2016 Est.
Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total
1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
Office of Scientific Review                  
Direct: 6 - 6 6 - 6 6 - 6
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6 - 6 6 - 6 6 - 6
Basic and Mechanistic Research in Complementary and Integrative Health Branch                  
Direct: 1 1 1 1 1 1
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 1 1 1 1 1 1
Clinical Investigations Branch                  
Direct: - - - - - - - - -
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: - - - - - - - - -
Clinical Research in Complementary and Integrative Health Branch                  
Direct: 1 1 1 1 1 1
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 1 1 1 1 1 1
Division of Extramural Activities                  
Direct: 2 - 2 2 - 2 2 - 2
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 2 - 2 2 - 2 2 - 2
Division of Extramural Research                  
Direct: 12 1 13 12 1 13 12 1 13
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 12 1 13 12 1 13 12 1 13
Division of Intramural Research Program                  
Direct: 4 1 5 4 1 5 4 1 5
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 4 1 5 4 1 5 4 1 5
Office of Administrative Operations                  
Direct: 14 - 14 14 - 14 14 - 14
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 14 - 14 14 - 14 14 - 14
Office of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs                  
Direct: 4 1 5 4 1 5 4 1 5
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 4 1 5 4 1 5 4 1 5
Office of Communications and Public Liaison                  
Direct: 8 - 8 9 - 9 9 - 9
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 8 - 8 9 - 9 9 - 9
Office of Grants Management                  
Direct: 6 - 6 6 - 6 6 - 6
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6 - 6 6 - 6 6 - 6
Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation                  
Direct: 6 - 6 6 - 6 6 - 6
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6 - 6 6 - 6 6 - 6
Office of the Director                  
Direct: 5 - 5 5 - 5 5 - 5
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 5 - 5 5 - 5 5 - 5
Pain and Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory                  
Direct: 3 - 3 3 - 3 3 - 3
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 3 - 3 3 - 3 3 - 3
Total 72 3 75 73 3 76 73 3 76
FTEs supported by funds from Cooperative Research and Development Agreements. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Detail of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTE) (continued)
FISCAL YEAR Average GS Grade
2012 12.7
2013 12.7
2014 12.6
2015 12.6
2016 12.6

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health

Detail of Positions1
GRADE FY 2014 Actual FY 2015 Enacted FY 2016 President’s Budget
1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
Total, ES Positions 0 0 0
Total, ES Salary 0 0 0
GM/GS-15 10 10 10
GM/GS-14 20 20 20
GM/GS-13 14 14 14
GS-12 4 5 5
GS-11 7 7 7
GS-10 0 0 0
GS-9 3 3 3
GS-8 2 2 2
GS-7 3 3 3
GS-6 0 0 0
GS-5 0 0 0
GS-4 0 0 0
GS-3 1 1 1
GS-2 0 0 0
GS-1 0 0 0
Subtotal 64 65 65
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) 0 0 0
Assistant Surgeon General 0 0 0
Director Grade 0 0 0
Senior Grade 2 2 2
Full Grade 1 1 1
Senior Assistant Grade 0 0 0
Assistant Grade 0 0 0
Subtotal 3 3 3
Ungraded 11 11 11
Total permanent positions 66 67 67
Total positions, end of year 78 79 79
Total full-time equivalent (FTE) employment, end of year 75 76 76
Average ES salary 0 0 0
Average GM/GS grade 12.6 12.6 12.6
Average GM/GS salary 108,683 108,683 108,683

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This page last modified September 24, 2017