National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health

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Overview: What NCCIH Funds

On this page:

What is NCCIH?

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) is one of the 27 institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

View NCCIH's mission

What does NCCIH Fund?

NCCIH funds:

  • Scientific research on complementary and integrative health*.
  • Training of researchers. Find out about training opportunities.

To better understand our goals and priorities, review:

This graphic depicts two priority areas covering what NCCIH studies[1]: mind and body practices (acupuncture, massage, meditatino, spinal manipulation, deep-breathing exercises, hypnotherapy, qi gong, tai chi, etc.) and natural products (herbs, botanicals, dietary supplements, probiotics, etc.).  Six important questions about complementary health approaches include: pain; interactions and safety; biological effects; mechanisms; healthy behaviors; and symptoms.

Note: NCCIH does not support the development or delivery of clinical practice other than as a component of funded research.

How does NCCIH make funding decisions?

We only award funding in response to grant applications sent to NIH.

NCCIH, like other NIH institutes and centers, accepts investigator-initiated applications that are based on ideas formulated by the applicant. Researchers may refer to Types of Grants and Active Funding Announcements to find grant opportunities that may be appropriate for them.

Scientific review groups at the NIH Center for Scientific Review (CSR) or NCCIH Special Emphasis Panels provide peer review by assessing the scientific merit of all applications. The funding process is competitive. Applications with the best ratings are considered for funding.

In Fiscal Year 2014, NCCIH’s success rate for research project grants was 9%.  The success rate is defined as the total number of competing applications funded divided by the total number of competing applications reviewed.

The Funding Strategy explains how NCCIH funds applications.

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