National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

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Statistics From the National Health Interview Survey

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is an annual study, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), in which tens of thousands of Americans are interviewed about their health- and illness-related experiences. The complementary health approaches section of NHIS, developed by NCHS and NCCIH, was administered in 2002, 2007, and 2012. 

2012 NHIS

The 2012 NHIS survey is the most current, comprehensive, and reliable source of information on the use of complementary health approaches by U.S. adults and children.  Learn more about the 2012 NHIS survey and how to access the data:

The 2012 questionnaires:

2007 NHIS

The 2007 NHIS gathered data from 23,393 completed interviews with U.S. adults aged 18 years and over and 9,417 completed interviews for U.S. children aged 0–17. The 2007 complementary health approaches section included questions on 36 types of complementary therapies commonly used in the United States—10 types of provider-based therapies, such as acupuncture and chiropractic, and 26 other therapies that do not require a provider, such as herbal supplements and meditation.

2002 NHIS

The 2002 NHIS gathered data from 31,044 completed interviews with U.S. adults age 18 years and over. The 2002 complementary health section of NHIS included questions on 27 types of complementary therapies commonly used in the United States. These included 10 types of provider-based therapies, such as acupuncture and chiropractic, and 17 other therapies that do not require a provider, such as natural products (herbs or botanical products), special diets, and megavitamin therapy.

Resources:

* Note: PDF files require a viewer such as the free Adobe Reader.