National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
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Wellness and Well-Being

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Some people use complementary health approaches in an effort to promote general well-being or wellness, rather than to help manage symptoms of a health problem. For example, 2012 national survey data show that people most often use yoga and dietary supplements for wellness. Wellness has several dimensions, including emotional well-being (coping effectively with life and creating satisfying relationships) and physical well-being (recognizing the need for physical activity, healthy foods, and sleep).  

Research sponsored by NCCIH suggests that people who use complementary approaches for wellness tend to have better overall health, higher rates of physical activity, and lower rates of obesity than those who use complementary approaches to help manage a health problem.

More research is needed to better understand how certain complementary health approaches can be useful in encouraging better self-care, improving a personal sense of well-being, and promoting a greater commitment to a healthy lifestyle. Participants at an April 2018 roundtable on emotional well-being explored research gaps and opportunities (Emotional Well-Being: Emerging Insights and Questions for Future Research).

Watch our Emotional Well-Being video series:

 

This page last modified October 31, 2018